Review #102: The Clash, The Clash

Karla Clifton
2 min readJun 9, 2021

#102: The Clash, The Clash

Okay, first of all, that’s two albums in a row that are self-titled. See, it’s connections like that that will keep us sane.

According to the RS blurb, Mick Jones played pretty much all the guitar on this because Joe Strummer didn’t think that studio guitar wasn’t punk enough, which is going to be my excuse as to why I can’t do things for the rest of my life. It’s not punk to do taxes. It’s not punk to wash your hair.

In my opinion, the Clash are kind of like a British, ’70s era Green Day, and not just because it’s a three-piece punk outfit. They are very catchy and jammy and all their lyrics sound like a sixteen-year-old with blue hair is shouting them from the middle of a pharmacy parking lot.

That’s all to say: I love them, but I don’t think they’re always good.

FAVORITE SONGS:

“Janie Jones” — I was surprised that I knew this song.

“Remote Control” — I’m just programmed to love music like this.

“I’m So Bored with the USA” — Me too.

“White Riot” — The best song on this album by far. Honestly, this song was so good that it made me wish I was listening to London Calling.

“Hate & War” If I close my eyes/ It will not go away.

“What’s My Name” — This could be a Green Day song.

“London’s Burning” — This basically IS a Green Day song.

“Career Opportunities” — I love songs about unemployment.

“Cheat” I get violent/ When I’m f***ed up. I appreciate songs with extremely frank messages.

“Protex Blue” — Apparently this is referencing a brand of condom.

“Police & Thieves” — Should be called “Cops & Robbers.”

LEAST FAVORITE SONGS:

“Garageland” — His voice is a bit of a challenge for me in this one.

IS RS FULL OF IT?

To be honest, I feel like the only really great song on this album is “White Riot.” The rest are pretty good too, but they’re uninspiring compared to London Calling. And I can think of about fifty different albums that belong here, like Sam’s Town by the Killers.

Review #101: Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin

Review #103: 3 Feet High and Rising, De La Soul

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